Category Name: practice updates

practice updates

Acute Aortic Dissection

Aortic dissection is a life-threatening yet infrequent diagnosis, estimated at about three cases in every 100,000 person years (1,2). Because of its low frequency and emergency nature, large randomized controlled trials are difficult to conduct (3). Thus, the International Registry of Acute Aortic D...

practice updates

Ultrasound for Small Bowel Obstruction

Editor's note: This article was listed in EM Curious' #FOAMed Review 19th Ed. Quicker diagnosis (vs waiting for CT), quicker treatment (IVF, NG tube, surgery), and earlier consult/admission to Surgical team. Everyone benefits: ED flow, overburdened nurses, other patients requiring attention in the ED, and most of all, the patient himself.

practice updates

Wrist Injuries: Pearls and Pitfalls

Wrist pain is a frequent emergency department complaint. Most presentations are due to an acute traumatic injury. Furthermore, overuse or repetitive motion mechanisms cause ED visits for either an acute injury or an exacerbation of chronic pain conditions. For the purposes of this post, the wrist is...

practice updates

Thromboelastography (TEGĀ®) for Trauma

Editor's note: This article was listed in LITFL Review 154's "Best of #FOAMcc Critical Care" section. Using thromboelastography in goal-oriented algorithms, clinicians may be able to optimize targeted transfusion therapies with specific coagulation factor(s) instead of empirically administering multiple components with potentially hazardous effects.

practice updates

Don't be RASH: Emergency Physician's Approach to the Undifferentiated Lesion

Editor's note: This post was listed in both the #FOAMED Review from EM Curious AND in the LITFL Review 154 "Best of #FOAMed" section. As an EM physician, it is difficult to have working knowledge of the hundreds of different types of rashes that exist. However, I argue that it is not the job of the ...

practice updates

Left Bundle Branch Block in Myocardial Infarction: An Update

Editor's note: This article was listed in the LITFL Review 154's "Best of #FOAMed" section. The left bundle branch arises from the Bundle of His, and subsequently is divided into the anterior and posterior fascicles. The anterior fascicle is usually supplied by septal perforators from the Left Anter...