EM Mindset: Rob Orman – The Successful ED Mindset

mindsetWe at emDocs are proud to introduce our new series called “EM Mindset.” We hope our audience enjoys the pearls of wisdom that each of these seasoned EM vets have to offer on developing the “EM Mindset.”

In case you missed it, please check out the first post of this series by Bob Stuntz. Look out for “EM Mindset Mondays.” Enjoy!

 

Author: Rob Orman, MD (@emergencypdx) // Editors: Alex Koyfman, MD (@EMHighAK) and Manpreet Singh, MD (@MPrizzleER)

Featured on the LITFL Review #179 – Thanks to Dr. Anand “Swami” Swaminathan (@EMSwami) and the LITFL Review group for the shout out!

Humility

Humility that we don’t know everything and that we might not always be right. Arrogance can close the mind to new ideas, alternative diagnoses and a drive to learn. If we think we know everything, what’s the point in trying to improve?

Stamina

There are few lulls in an emergency department shift. One rarely sits and often there’s not enough time to go to the bathroom, let alone eat. Even clerical tasks like documentation take tremendous focus. It’s not just the physicality of the job that’s draining, it’s the mental and psychological intensity. We become immune to much of it, but moments of reflection or relaxation are rare to nonexistent.

If you are interested in reading the rest of this and other EM Mindset pieces, please see “An Emergency Medicine Mindset,” a collection evaluating the thought process of emergency physicians. This book is available as ebook and print on Amazon.

7 thoughts on “EM Mindset: Rob Orman – The Successful ED Mindset”

  1. Rob —

    As always, you are the man.

    Appreciation, team-building, and advocacy are our guards against the onslaught of the darkness that may descend on us as we are trying to fight the good fight. We need to be good to each other — co-workers and patients alike — for the good of all, and for the sanity of, well, those interested in such things.

    Thank you for your insight and humanity. In times of trouble and uncertainty, you are a beacon of truth, righteousness, fine example, and — let’s be honest — awesomeness par excellence.

    Stay thirsty, my friend.

  2. Rob —

    As always, you are the man.

    Appreciation, team-building, and advocacy are our guards against the onslaught of the darkness that may descend on us as we are trying to fight the good fight. We need to be good to each other — co-workers and patients alike — for the good of all, and for the sanity of, well, those interested in such things.

    Thank you for your insight and humanity. In times of trouble and uncertainty, you are a beacon of truth, righteousness, fine example, and — let’s be honest — awesomeness par excellence.

    Stay thirsty, my friend.

  3. Well said! I’ll use this as a priming tool for the upcoming discussions with EM interested students in the coming months. Thanks!

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