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Carbon Monoxide Poisoning

Author: Zach Radwine, MD (EM Resident Physician, University of Illinois College of Medicine – Peoria) // Editors: Jennifer Robertson, MD, Lewis Nelson, MD and Alex Koyfman, MD (@EMHighAK) Featured on the LITFL Review #180 – Thanks to Joe-Anthony Rotella and the LITFL Review group for the shout out!  Introduction Carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning leads to an estimated […]

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Pediatric SHOCK Index

Originally published at Pediatric EM Morsels on March 6, 2015. Reposted with permission. Follow Dr. Sean M. Fox on twitter @PedEMMorsels Fortunately, the critically ill child is not as common in the Emergency Department as the critically ill adult. Unfortunately, when the critically ill child does arrive, it can be challenging to recognize him/her initially. This […]

practice updates

EM Mindset: Rob Orman – The Successful ED Mindset

We at emDocs are proud to introduce our new series called "EM Mindset." We hope our audience enjoys the pearls of wisdom that each of these seasoned EM vets have to offer on developing the "EM Mindset." In case you missed it, please check out the first post of this series by Bob Stuntz. Look out for "EM Mindset Mondays." Enjoy!

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Management of Cellulitis in the Immunocompromised Patient

Pearls and Pitfalls Cellulitis that is associated with purulent drainage is commonly associated with Staphylococcus Aureus compared to non-purulent cellulitis that is more commonly β hemolytic streptococcus. Antimicrobial therapy should be directed at the organism in question. Cellulitis may not appear as red and can span the gamut from pale to violet coloration in deeper infections. Pain is not always present particularly in immunocompromised patients. Cultures from peripheral blood, needle aspirates, skin biopsies, and surgical specimens have a relatively low yield. They should be considered however in patients with purulent drainage, those who failed outpatient therapy, or immunocompromised patients.

practice updates

Does IV contrast cause renal failure?

We hear about contrast-induced nephropathy all the time. We tell patients about it. We often need their consent. Radiology calls us to make sure administering contrast is okay. But is it as bad as we think? How do we proceed?