recent articles

Ultrasound G.E.L.

Ultrasound G.E.L. – POCUS in Sepsis

Sepsis is a disease that is prevalent and has a high mortality. We now have a lot of emphasis being placed on early diagnosis of sepsis, early antibiotics, and early source control. We know that ultrasound can find a lot of potential causes for sepsis, and it can potentially save some time in doing so. This article takes a look to see how the diagnosis made with ultrasound compares to a traditional work up - both in time and accuracy.

ultrasound

US Probe: When Does an Effusion Become Pericardial Tamponade?

Pericardial tamponade occurs when fluid within the pericardial sac impairs filling of the right-sided chambers, leading to a decrease in cardiac output and hemodynamic compromise. It is neither a clinical nor an echocardiographic diagnosis alone. Rather, the echocardiogram carries diagnostic value and should be performed when there is an elevated pre-test probability for tamponade based on the history and physical exam. Here, we will illustrate the core echocardiographic findings of pericardial tamponade.

ultrasound

US Probe: E-Point Septal Separation (EPSS) in the CHF Patient

EPSS is a simple, easy to learn tool that allows a quick estimation of left ventricular function. The value of EPSS lies in its objective findings that do not require specialized training for interpretation and utilization, as shown by numerous studies. In patients without mitral or aortic valvular pathology, EPSS can be obtained from a single echocardiography view, providing quantifiable information on heart function within minutes. EPSS > 7mm is typically cited as the cut-off for abnormal ejection fraction (<50%). It offers a further tool for inexperienced emergency physicians that can be used to complement the overall assessment and risk stratification of patients with congestive heart failure.