Ask Me Anything with Rob Rogers, MD, FACEP

We’re excited to announce our next Ask Me Anything will be with Rob Rogers! He’ll be joining us this Thursday, October 2nd, from 3-4pm EST to answer your questions on emergency medicine and medical education. In the meantime, go check out some of his great work on iTeachEM.

  Ask Me Anything with Rob Rogers, MD, FACEP (10/02/2014) 
2:58
Baker Hamilton: 

Welcome to Ask Me Anything with Rob Rogers! We’ll be getting started in just a few minutes.

Thursday October 2, 2014 2:58 Baker Hamilton
3:06
[Comment From SammySammy: ] 

Hey Rob, what is it that makes a good educator?

Thursday October 2, 2014 3:06 Sammy
 
Rob Rogers: 

Great question. And lots of answers. I would say the number one thing is passion for inspiring learners. Right up with that is enthusiasm for teaching and having the belief that you can change the world one learner at a time. Educating isn’t about lecturing, writing, podcasting, etc. It’s about inspiring others to greatness.

  Rob Rogers
3:11
Rob Rogers: 

The other REALLY important skill that great educators have is being a good role model. No better way to demonstrate how to be a great physician than by actually being a great physician.

Thursday October 2, 2014 3:11 Rob Rogers
3:19
[Comment From EMSwamiEMSwami: ] 

Rob – you’re a busy man. How do you go about off-loading tasks? When is it okay to say no and what should you say no to?

Thursday October 2, 2014 3:19 EMSwami
 
Rob Rogers: 

Learning how to say no is tough. Early on in my career I said yes to everything. But clearly you have to learn how to do it. When I transitioned to more “no” I asked mentors how to do it without hurting my career.

  Rob Rogers
3:20
[Comment From Alex KoyfmanAlex Koyfman: ] 

What are 3 things that have shaped your career in Academic EM?

Thursday October 2, 2014 3:20 Alex Koyfman
 
Rob Rogers: 

Good mentoring is #1. Motivation to be the best educator and affect the most learners

  Rob Rogers
3:21
[Comment From SammySammy: ] 

also, on the same note….what are some signs of a bad educator?

Thursday October 2, 2014 3:21 Sammy
 

Rob Rogers: 

not enthusiastic. teaches for the wrong reasons. Great educators remember what it was like to be a learner (student/resident)

  Rob Rogers
3:22
[Comment From JohnJohn: ] 

Hi Rob! John from Sweden here, let me first say that I really admire everything you do for FOAMed, was glued to your live streaming of the Teaching Course and am of course hoping to go there live someday:) I wanted to ask your opinion on small group sessions and how to make them as effective and inspirational as possible. Let’s say that we want to talk about CHF and how you identify and start treating it in the e.r. Bedside teaching is of course better but sometimes we are confined to just a study room and six to eight students and maybe an hour time wise . Do you usually go with interactive cases or how would you go about it?

Thursday October 2, 2014 3:22 John
 
Rob Rogers: 

Small groups. Can be easy to run or a disaster. Best is to prep before you start and make sure you know what you are doing. Can have people read, watch SHORT 10 min videos beforehand (flip the class). Most skilled teachers who do small groups do very little talking.

  Rob Rogers
3:24
[Comment From GuestGuest: ] 

Hi Dr. Rogers, I read your teaching textbook, which was very helpful in developing a foundation as an educator. However, in terms of seeking an academic position out of residency, what advice do you have on presenting oneself as being an educator as one’s future niche?

Thursday October 2, 2014 3:24 Guest
 
Rob Rogers: 

Get as involved as humanly possible. Go to meetings. Get on social media (Twitter) and interact with educators. I met great friends and mentors on Twitter-Mike Cadogan, Chris Nickson, etc. I have met tons of people on Twitter who have somehow helped me and my career. Social media is key. It allows you to “hit the accelerator” on your career development

  Rob Rogers
3:26
[Comment From Alex KoyfmanAlex Koyfman: ] 

What are your favorite strategies for approaching different levels of resident learners?

Thursday October 2, 2014 3:26 Alex Koyfman
 
Rob Rogers: 

I think the most important step is in stepping back for a moment before teaching to ask yourself what stage the leaners is at. Biggest mistake I have seen made is in charging in and approaching teaching with a cookie cutter approach. Pause….and make sure you are teaching to the level of the learner. Most people don’t pause.

  Rob Rogers
3:28
[Comment From guestguest: ] 

I’m thinking about writing a core content Infectious Disease book…would you recommend focusing on making it a digital resource like an iPhone app or ibook or still go for an old school textbook?

Thursday October 2, 2014 3:28 guest
 
Rob Rogers: 

I love books. I admit it. But publishing paper books is a dinosaur looking for a tar pit. Digital is the way to go. Just look at MAtt Dawson and Mike Mallins Ultrasound Books–paper books are ok but personally my current and future efforts will be digital only

  Rob Rogers
3:28
[Comment From Alex KoyfmanAlex Koyfman: ] 

What are a few changes that you foresee for EM education?

Thursday October 2, 2014 3:28 Alex Koyfman
 
Rob Rogers: 

Less conference time and more distance learning. Not sure when we will wake up and realize that residents don’t need 5 hours of didactic material.

  Rob Rogers
3:30
[Comment From AdairaAdaira: ] 

What are some points in your career were you were like, “Wow, I wish someone told me that sooner?”

Thursday October 2, 2014 3:30 Adaira
 
Rob Rogers: 

Fortunately it hasn’t happened to me, but be careful on social media. WHat you put out there is permanent. PERMANENT. SO be careful.

Develop a niche or specialty ares that makes you unique. Fellowship in something is the way to go. Make yourself marketable.

  Rob Rogers
3:32
[Comment From EMSwamiEMSwami: ] 

Let me give you a concrete example as I’d love to see your thoughts. Early in your career, you took on a project that’s quite involved – multiple meetings, lots of deadlines etc. At first you were very passionate about it but now, you’ve found other things you want to do . How do you get out of the responsibility?

Thursday October 2, 2014 3:32 EMSwami
 
Rob Rogers: 

It’s ok to gracefully bow out of involvement. I think the best way to do this is a face to face meeting with the person or persons involved. Getting out of commitments is best done in person–you lose tone and meaning in email. Of course this isn’t always possible. If your involvement in something is taking too much time…you owe it to yourself and others to get out.

  Rob Rogers
3:33
[Comment From Alex KoyfmanAlex Koyfman: ] 

What are areas in social media that we in EM can improve upon from our current state?

Thursday October 2, 2014 3:33 Alex Koyfman
 
Rob Rogers: 

A true FOAMed curriculum. And I think we are already seeing it now. More and more organization.

  Rob Rogers
3:33
[Comment From ManuManu: ] 

How can a new intern get off to a great start? (in EM or in general)

Thursday October 2, 2014 3:33 Manu
 
Rob Rogers: 

It’s all about attitude and being a hard worker and true team member.

  Rob Rogers
3:35
[Comment From GuestGuest: ] 

What is the
biggest mistake you’ve made in your career?

Thursday October 2, 2014 3:35 Guest
 
Rob Rogers: 

Hitting the send button on email before thinking things through. HUGE. If you are angry and your instinct says reply now….don’t do it.

  Rob Rogers
3:36
[Comment From guestguest: ] 

piggy back…is there anything else aside from twitter that I can use to launch my career?

Thursday October 2, 2014 3:36 guest
 
Rob Rogers: 

It’s all about involvement. Meeting people. Showing people you are interested. Read everything there is to know about your area of interest. Keep up with FOAMed and all of the awesome things that are out there.

  Rob Rogers
3:36
[Comment From Alex KoyfmanAlex Koyfman: ] 

What are 3 myths in EM you’d like to see go away?

Thursday October 2, 2014 3:36 Alex Koyfman
 
Rob Rogers: 

1. Having a “negative” stress test does not protect you from a future MI

I have so many I can’t even list them in all…:-)

  Rob Rogers
3:38
[Comment From Alex KoyfmanAlex Koyfman: ] 

How do you keep yourself motivated/inspired to grow as an educator?

Thursday October 2, 2014 3:38 Alex Koyfman
 
Rob Rogers: 

Daily self talk that what I am doing does matter. How I teach and what I d
o to inspire does matter. The other thing is key: Surrounding myself with great people. I surround myself with the likes of Swami, Haney Mallemat, Salim Rezaie, and many more. Great ones make you want to be even better. They motivate you and make your daily affirmation that what you are doing matters more real.

  Rob Rogers
3:39
[Comment From Manu VarmaManu Varma: ] 

What advice do you have for interns or junior residents working with medical students?

Thursday October 2, 2014 3:39 Manu Varma
 
Rob Rogers: 

Remember what it was like to be in their shoes. It’s that simple. Remember: they may very well be treating a family member of yours someday…so treat them with care. WHAT you teach and HOW you teach matters more than you will ever know.

  Rob Rogers
3:41
[Comment From GuestGuest: ] 

back to the question about reputation in public/social media…how do you protect yourself from doing or saying “the wrong thing”….

Thursday October 2, 2014 3:41 Guest
 
Rob Rogers: 

If you wouldn’t want it posted on an interstate sign then don’t post it on Twitter. I now NO LONGER post any political comments/viewpoints, or rants on Twitter or Facebook. Just don’t do it. Plus, negative comments on Twitter don’t help anyone anyway. The world is already too negative. Add to the positive.

  Rob Rogers
3:42
[Comment From GuestGuest: ] 

re: career development…I’m a junior resident and trying to figure out what I want to do in 1 year. Do you think its best/easier to progress a career through a medical school or with residency leadership? I like both so having a hard time choosing…if you could do it all again would you choose one path versus the other or both?

Thursday October 2, 2014 3:42 Guest
 
Rob Rogers: 

Depends on what your passion is. Find that and you may very well have answered your own question.

  Rob Rogers

3:44
[Comment From SamSam: ] 

Since tweeting while pooping is obviously much safer than pooping while driving, do you recommend it for efficiency?

Thursday October 2, 2014 3:44 Sam
 
Rob Rogers: 

Just laughed out loud. Good one. I don’t recommend Tweeting while in the bathroom. Ever read the studies on what they have cultured in bathrooms, seats, floor, etc.

Have I and do I do it? Hmmm….pausing here since what I type will become permanent and likely tweeted…..”maybe” 🙂

  Rob Rogers
3:48
[Comment From GuestGuest: ] 

How do you find work-life balance given all of your responsibilities? I heard you once say during a talk that you work(ed) nights so that you still get to see your kids. Is there anything else you recommend?

Thursday October 2, 2014 3:48 Guest
 
Rob Rogers: 

Tough question. My biggest thing has been picking and choosing what to say yes to.

I currently only work overnights (11pm-7am)…I sleep in the day when the kids are at school..and I DON’T miss soccer, homework, school events, parties, etc.

I constantly gauge my balance (and I do it every day) by asking myself will I have regrets when I am older. How many of us will be 80- year olds sitting on our front porch and lamenting over that one conference we didn’t attend. None.

We only have one chance to get it right with our family. ONE CHANCE. Make good decisions.

Its tough but balancing is the key. I work alot at night and do tasks in my office when my kids aren’t around (school,e tc)

  Rob Rogers
3:48
[Comment From Alex KoyfmanAlex Koyfman: ] 

How have you changed your clinical practice in the last few years?

Thursday October 2, 2014 3:48 Alex Koyfman
 
Rob Rogers: 

Much more cost conscious and less CT ordering.

  Rob Rogers
3:50
[Comment From ManriqueManrique: ] 

Any good tips on how to improve the bedside teaching experience?

Thursday October 2, 2014 3:50 Manrique
 
Rob Rogers: 

Practice with multiple ways to engage learners. See what they like. Ask them what they prefer. Funny thing is we rarely ask learners for feedback on our own teaching skills.

  Rob Rogers
3:51
[Comment From EMSwamiEMSwami: ] 

Something a bit more clinical. Judging from your lectures, you are obsessed with the aorta. Knowing what you know, how do you avoid working up dissection in everyone?

Thursday October 2, 2014 3:51 EMSwami
 
Rob Rogers: 

I think every case of working up someone adds to your clinical experience. How many patients do we workup and the results are negative for dissection? 99%+

Each negative workup adds to your clinical skills. That is why it is called the “practice” of medicine because it really does take practice to fine tune your skills.

  Rob Rogers
3:53
[Comment From GuestGuest: ] 

What particular educational resources do you personally like to learn from?

Thursday October 2, 2014 3:53 Guest
 
Rob Rogers: 

The FOAMed world. The SMARTFoam app (FREE) is a great resource for the latest blogs and podcasts. I also keep the big name podcasts on my phone in the Podcast app.

  Rob Rogers

3:53
[Comment From Alex KoyfmanAlex Koyfman: ] 

How have you been successful in convincing EM administration the importance of quality education; it doesn’t generate revenue like grants / seeing pts but indirectly it’s vital?

Thursday October 2, 2014 3:53 Alex Koyfman
 
Rob Rogers: 

Tough question. Not really. I try to stay away from admin anyway.

  Rob Rogers
3:54
Adaira Landry: 

Hey All! Thanks for your great questions so far…we have only a few minutes left. Be sure to get those questions submitted in time!

Thursday October 2, 2014 3:54 Adaira Landry
3:54
[Comment From WildernessEMCWildernessEMC: ] 

Hi Rob, Malin from New Zealand here. I volunteer with an organisation which teaches Outdoor Instructors wilderness prehospital emergency care. We are trying to update our curriculum to reflect current best practice and erode some old dogmatic unhelpful points. The learners’ background knowledge of physiology is limited and it is outside the scope to go into detail but I dislike asking them to “take a leap of faith” or blindly accept what we teach , which is contrary to what they have been taught in the past. We are modifying our scenarios to reflect this but I don’t want to confuse everyone . Any suggestions?

Thursday October 2, 2014 3:54 WildernessEMC
 
Rob Rogers: 

Send me an email or follow me on Twitter (@EM_Educator) and I would be more than happy to help.

  Rob Rogers
3:57
[Comment From GuestGuest: ] 

Regarding the negative stress test comment earlier…if a patient had a negative stress test last week and presents today with the SAME complaint and same risk factors (55M, smoker, HTN)…what are you doing? another stress test? discharge home? two-trop r/o?

Thursday October 2, 2014 3:57 Guest
 
Rob Rogers: 

depends on the stress…did they reach MPHR, i.e. was it a “good stress test”? If a patient with a really good story comes in they are generally observed or admitted. I have personally seen several cases of recent negative stress tests and STEMI. We had one with a STEMI and a neg stress the SAME day. Stress tests show ischemia and they give no info on plaque stability. Plaques can rupture anytime.

  Rob Rogers
3:57
[Comment From GuestGuest: ] 

If you are on the fence for doing a procedure (CVL/intubation)….could go either way…patient sorta of needs it but doesn’t really need it NOW….what do you do at that time? what factors do you take into consideration…

Thursday October 2, 2014 3:57 Guest
 
Rob Rogers: 

I generally ask myself the question: “Am I going to regret not doing this” And “is this in the patient’s best interest to delay the procedure?”

  Rob Rogers
3:59
Rob Rogers: 

Thanks for having me. Follow me on Twitter: @EM_Educator and keep asking me questions, Happy to help.

Thursday October 2, 2014 3:59 Rob Rogers
4:00
Adaira Landry: 

Thanks again everybody for participating in this AMA with Dr. Rob Rogers…go check out his awesome work on iTeachEM!! Thanks Dr. Rogers, your answers were helpful for us all!

Thursday October 2, 2014 4:00 Adaira Landry
 
 

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